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#Teachers: Cereal Box Book Report Idea (Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish for ages 6-10)


As so much of the plot of Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish centers around a box of cereal, I thought this clever and fun idea to build a book report around a cereal box was the perfect class or home school activity to feature here on the Katie & Kimble Blog. The activity comes from the book 24 Ready-to-Go Genre Book Reports by Susan Ludwig (Scholastic) and was adapted for the Katie & Kimble Blog by Mrs. Barbara Day, a 4th grade teacher from Des Moines, Iowa.

 

24 Ready-to-Go Genre Book Reports: Engaging Activities with Reproducibles, Rubrics, and Everything You Need to Help Students Get the Most Out of Their Independent Reading

 

My students read fiction, and created a Cereal Box Book Report. Students were to invent a cereal based on a fictional book that they had read during the month. They were to think of a name and shape for the cereal that was somehow connected to the book they had read. We covered real cereal boxes with paper, and each side of the box was to follow a specific guideline:

 

 

* Front: the name of the cereal and picture to go with it.
* Back: A game based on the story, which must include information from the story.
* Right Side: Ingredients—the characters and story setting. (Some of the kids got confused on this one and just listed food ingredients.)
* Left Side: A summary of the book, including the main conflict and resolution.
* Top: The title and author of the book, and the student’s name.

 

 

The last step was for students to plan and present a commercial for their cereal to the class. I was very pleased with the results. We had 100% completion of this project, and the kids seemed enthusiastic.
Thank you to Mrs. Day for sharing your classroom experience with us, and to Ms. Ludwig for allowing us to reproduce such an exciting classroom activity from her creative book. We appreciate it!

 



 

Mom’s Choice Awards® has named the Katie & Kimble seriesamong the best in family-friendly media, products and services.

 


Winner: Juvenile Books Series.



Now you can read the first 6 chapters of Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story for free. Click here to download the PDF. All the pictures are included!

c) 2015-2016

Teaching Your Kids to Give (Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story for ages 6-10)

 

Teaching Your Kids To Give

 

Establishing the mentality of life-long giving

 

By Jennifer L. Jacobson and Gretchen Barry(used with permission)

 

While raising kids has never been easy, it can be one of the most rewarding things that some people do–especially when children grow up to be productive, contributing members to society, and that includes knowing how to give back and enrich the communities in which they live. When should children start participating in the giving process? As early as possible. Even if they’re still toddlers; observing charitable acts that happen regularly and eventually understanding them, will leave a big impression. Learning how to give and developing that skillset is a lifelong journey. Giving is more than a task; it’s a mindset. A way of life, a way of looking at the world and asking, how can I help? How can I make connections between needs and time and resources? How can I bring awareness to specific needs and evoke action?

 

Ask Your Kids How They Would Like to Help.

 

If giving to a cause is new to your household, involve your kids as early as possible; tell them that your family has the chance to give back. Then, engage them in a conversation about the types of causes they may feel strongly about and ways they think they can help. This could involve helping families, working to save open spaces, caring for nature or a community garden, helping to save an endangered species, or helping those in need.

 

Once you’ve identified key topics that your family is interested in, (make a list, as this helps visualize everything), start researching specific local organizations (add them to the list). Food kitchens Pet shelters and animal rescues Nature conservation efforts Fundraising for various activities for low-income kids, like camp Zoos, museums, and aquariums Schools and local libraries (these days, even they need as much help as they can get) Visitation of patients in hospitals Visitation of the elderly in nursing homes.

 

Make a Game Plan.

 

Get creative about how your family can help the organization(s) you choose. Bake sales are traditional, but there are other ways to help. Talk it through with your family, map it out, and post the results somewhere in the home that is highly visible. Gamify it to some degree with tasks that turn into goals that turn into accomplishment, that result in stickers.

 

Quick Tasks and Ideas That Can Make a Big Difference.

 

• Clear the clutter. Every 6 to 12 months, have a household closet cleaning day (that includes the toy chest, and maybe even the garage). Get everyone in the family to help.

 

• Make a donate box. Put it out where your kids can add to it. Donate often, even if it’s small.

 

• Make Detours to Giving. When shopping, make a trip down the canned foods isle. Ask your kids to pick a can of food to put in your donate box at home.

 

• Find ways to raise money for donations. Hold a yard sale and give all or a portion of it to a selected charity. Do the same with a bake sale, an art sale, etc. Involve our kids at all stages.

 

• Associate getting with giving. For birthdays and holidays, aside from their other gifts, give your kids a hand-written gift “certificate of giving” with a specified amount of money that they can gift to their favorite charity. Take your child to the charity to donate that money in person if you can. For non-local organizations, write a check, and have your child include a letter.

 

• Volunteer time in your local community. From public gardens that need weeding, to historic buildings that need painting, or food banks that need help, find something age-appropriate that can engage your family.

 

Growing the Mindset.

 

• Tell stories. There are lots of real-life stories about kids or groups of kids who have found creative ways to give back. Encourage empathy. Share appropriate stories of struggle. Ask kids; what would you do in this situation? How would you want people to help you?

 

• Walk them through the cycle. If your kids are very young, say, “We’re going to give this can of food/winter coat/gift to ______. (Then explain the results.) “It will give them something to eat/keep them warm this winter/help them __________.”

 

• Explain why you are doing it and what you’re looking for. “We don’t need to store all this stuff, when someone else could really use it.” Or, “I bet there is a kid out there who would really enjoy playing with that toy. I know you used to love it but how about if you pass it along to someone else, so they can enjoy it as much as you have?” Keep the focus on the people in need and your child’s ability to share an experience through an item. Establishing an impermanent relationship to “things” can help kids better understand the important of relationships over acquiring goods.

 

• Develop a language of giving in your household. Find creative opportunities to incorporate it into regular conversation. Nothing is permanent. We are stewards of the planet, and the things we think we own. Everything is in change, and it is our duty to help those in need when we have abundance. If ever there is a time when we are without, we hope that others will think of us and help us. Teaching children about the struggles of others not only develops a lifelong giving mindset, it also helps children understand how their words and actions impact those around them–a lesson that bears repeating.

 

About the Authors: Jennifer L. Jacobson is the founder of Jacobson Communication and an advocate for organizations looking to make a positive difference in the world. She currently serves on the board of several influential nonprofits and organizations focused on conservation, education, and community. For more, visit www.jacobsoncommunication.com Gretchen Barry is the Director of marketing and Communications for NonProfitEasy; the all-in-one data management software, created by nonprofits for nonprofits. From CRM and database management, to events, donor engagement, fundraising, and more, NonProfitEasy offers a one-stop, affordable, integrated software solution that is changing the status quo for the greater good. For more, visit www.nonprofiteasy.com

 


Mom’s Choice Awards® has named the Katie & Kimble series among the best in family-friendly media, products and services.

 

Winner: Juvenile Books Series.

 

 



Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story (Book 1 in the series) and Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2 in the series) are available here:

Paperback version: $5.95

 

Click here to order Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story!

Click here to order Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2)!




Happy Hanukkah! Watch the Dreidel Songs Here! Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story for ages 6-10



In Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story, Book 1 in the Katie & Kimble series, Kimble teaches Katie how to play dreidel.

 

Dreidel is a game that Jewish children play during Hanukah.

 

Dreidels come in many sizes with many different designs and colors. The dreidel pictured on the left is called a Noah’s Ark dreidel because the pictures tell the story of Noah’s Ark. It was painted by an artist named Yair Emanuel. It’s got a little stand to hold it up.

 

The dreidel below is really something amazing to see. It’s very big – 10 inches high, in fact – and it’s a plush toy! I thought that was pretty interesting. I don’t suppose you can actually play dreidel with such a big dreidel, but it might be comfy to keep on your bed!

 

In Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story, you learn how to play dreidel at the same time that Kimble teaches
Katie how to play.

 

Below, I’ve included a couple of great Dreidel Song videos. In the first one, Jono sings about his favorite game, Dreidel, but he gets the history of playing dreidel all mixed up. When the rabbi tries to correct him, Jono just doesn’t listen!

 

 

Kenny Ellis sings his hit single from his Hanukkah Swings! Album on Favored Nations Records. Check out: www.kennyellis.com

 

 


Interesting Fact:
Hanukah is sometimes spelled in different ways! You might see it like this, with 2 k’s–Hanukkah–or you might see it like this, with a c–Chanukah!

 



Mom’s Choice Awards® has named the Katie & Kimble series among the best in family-friendly media, products and services.

 

 

Winner: Juvenile Books Series.


Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story (Book 1 in the series) and Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2 in the series) are available in the Katie & Kimble Shop and also on Amazon.com:

 

Paperback version: $5.95

 

Click here to order Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story!


Click here to order Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2)!


 


[Reading Level 3, 280L, for ages 6-10]

 

Nine-year-old Katie Russell and her family look normal. But the Russells don’t know they are living with Kimble, the ghost of a ten-year-old girl. That is, until Katie discovers Kimble and the two of them set off on a quest to find out what happened to Kimble’s mother.


 

© 2009-2015 by Linda Thieman

True Stories from the author of Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story — When I was 7: My Dog

by Linda Thieman, author, Katie & Kimble

Hi! My name is Linda Thieman (pronounced TEE-mun). I write the Katie & Kimble stories.



I wanted to share with you my favorite story from when I was 7 years old. This is a true story. It happened to me!

 

 


When I was six, my dad decided we should have a dog. My mom agreed. My little sister, Nancy, and I were very excited, too.

 

We went over to some friends of my dad’s. They were a married couple named Bob and Lucretia. We saw their puppies—they were Labradors, or Labs.

 

We chose the cutest little black Lab puppy. We liked him because he had a crooked tail. Then, we needed to pick a name. My dad suggested we name the dog after his friends. We all liked the idea. So, we named the dog Lubo—“Lu” for Lucretia and “bo” for Bob. I thought this was kind of funny since Prince William and his wife, Catherine, named their little, black dog “Lupo”–it’s almost the same!

 

Lubo grew into a very big dog. He was really my dad’s dog. We had a big backyard with a fence around it. Lubo was happy to run free outside, safe in the big backyard.

 

Lubo was too big to be a house dog. At night, Lubo would sleep in the garage. Sometimes he got bored in the garage, so he ate our picnic table! Or chewed it to pieces, anyway.

 

My dad liked to do experiments with Lubo. He’d try something different and then see what happened. For example, Dad would walk Lubo down to the corner of our block. It was quite far away. Then, he’d tell Lubo to “sit.” Then my dad would walk home. Lubo stayed and sat at the corner. When Dad got home, he’d turn around and whistle loudly. Then Lubo would come running.

 

One time, when I was 7, my dad decided to do another experiment with Lubo. My dad came into the living room to get my little sister and me. My sister was 5. Dad said, “I want to try something with Lubo. I’ll pretend that I’m spanking Nancy. Then Nancy can pretend she’s crying. Then we’ll see what Lubo does.” It was a funny idea, especially since Dad never spanked us!

 

Nancy and I agreed to go along with it. So, the three of us went out to the garage where Lubo was. Dad sat down on the steps in front of the door to the kitchen. Nancy leaned over his lap. Then he pretended he was angry. He also pretended he was spanking her. And Nancy pretended she was crying.

 

It didn’t take long and Lubo was right there, growling at my dad! We were so surprised because Lubo never growled. Lubo was trying to protect my sister!

 

Well, Dad put Nancy down and patted Lubo. We all had a good laugh. We didn’t know that Lubo was a guard dog!

 

Years later, when I was in junior high, we had another dog. Her name was JP. She was a short-legged Beagle. She was mostly black and white, with a little brown.

 

I guess my sister and I really take after our dad because we used to do experiments with JP, too. For example, JP had a gold plastic bed with a blue mattress.

Sometimes, we’d point to her bed and say, “Go to your bed!” She would always go.

 

So, one day, Nancy and I decided to take JP’s bed apart. We put the gold, plastic frame on one side of the room. Then we put the blue mattress on the other side of the room. Then I pointed to the area between the two parts of the bed. I said, “Go to your bed!”

 

So, JP looked at the gold frame and she looked at the blue mattress. She looked back and forth. She couldn’t decide. Finally, she walked over and sat on the blue mattress! She was not a stupid dog, that’s for sure.

 

What would you do? Think about it for a minute. If someone took your bed apart, where would you go? Would you lie down on the floor inside the metal frame? Or would you lie down on the mattress?

 

Oh, and by the way, JP got her name from the man who gave her to us. His name was Jerry Pile. That’s my dad for you!

 

 


Copyright © 2007-2015 by Linda Thieman

Watch the Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story Video Here (for ages 6-10)



Here’s something fun to do! Watch the video for Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story! The video tells the story of how Katie and Kimble meet, shows lots of colored pictures, and uses the Kimble, Kimble chant. You can find the words to the Kimble, Kimble chant over
on the sidebar of this blog and chant along.

 

You can click here to watch the video on You Tube, or you can watch the video below.

 

 







Mom’s Choice Awards® has named the Katie & Kimble series among the best in family-friendly media, products and services.

 

 

Winner: Juvenile Books Series.

 

 


 

©2010-2015 by Linda Thieman

A Great Book for Halloween – A Mom Blogger’s Review of Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story for ages 6-10



Time to get ready for Halloween! Mom blogger Kimberly over at She Scribes calls Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story “fun to read…for Halloween.”

 

She also calls it “funny” and “not a scary story.” In fact, she says, it is “more so a story about friendship and having a special bond with someone.”

 

Read Kimberly’s complete review here.



To read Chapters 1 through 6, click here!


[Reading Level 3, 280L, for ages 6-10]




Nine-year-old Katie Russell and her family look normal. But the Russells don’t know they are living with Kimble, the ghost of a ten-year-old girl. That is, until Katie discovers Kimble and the two of them set off on a quest to find out what happened to Kimble’s mother.

 




Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story (Book 1 in the series) and Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2 in the series) are available here:

Paperback version: $5.95

Click here to order Katie & Kimble: A Ghost Story!

Click here to order Katie & Kimble: The Magic Wish (Book 2)!






 



Please visit us here (http://katieandkimbleblog.com) for updates.




© 2009-2015 by Linda Thieman